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Ducted Cooker Hood Guide
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Ducted Cooker Hood Guide

posted in Ship Happens by Ship It Appliances on 14:38 Nov 2nd, 2014<< Back to Ship Happens

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There are two ways to fit cooker hoods: ducted or recirculating. While both options keep the air in your kitchen clean, they do so in very different ways. As such, they have specific requirements for fitting and maintenance.

How Does A Ducted Cooker Hood Work?
A ducted cooker hood extracts grease, odours, smoke and excess moisture from the kitchen air while you cook. While a recirculating hood cleans the air with a charcoal filter before recycling it back into the kitchen, a ducted hood brings the impurities outside through a hole in the kitchen wall. It is considered a more effective extraction option as a ducted hood can remove moisture from the air while a recirculating hood cannot.

Installation
Most of the cooker hoods that we sell at Ship It Appliances can be fitted with either ducted or recirculating installation. For ducted installation, you will need a ducting kit. It will also need to be installed against an external wall, through which a hole has been drilled. While many homeowners carry out this task on their, some will enlist in a professional to install the hood for them.

 

What Extraction Rate Does My Kitchen Need?
An important consideration when installing your ducted cooker hood is the extraction rate. While a higher extraction rate may seem to be the most effective, it may not be  the best fit for your kitchen.

Some simple maths will help you decide:

Your extractor should be able to clean 10 to 12 times the volume of air in your kitchen. So, multiply the area of your kitchen by the height of the ceiling. Then, multiply that number by 10 or 12. The resulting number will be the extraction rate that is best suited for your kitchen.

An example for a 10m2 kitchen with a 2m ceiling:

10m2 x 2m = 20
20 x 10 = 200m3 (the minimum extraction rate)
20 x 12 = 240m3 (the maximum extraction rate)

Maintenance
A major benefit of a ducted cooker hood is that it does not need to have its filters replaced. There is a metal grease filter on the inside that must be cleaned every so often, and this can be done quickly and easily. Some metal filters can even be cleaned in the dishwasher. Read our blog on how to clean a cooker hood grease filter.

 

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